Native Mapping Created by Native Americans

Native Mapping Created by Native Americans

Unsurprisingly, Native Americans used trees to mark their way across the landscape. They would tie young trees sideways to mark camping sites, watering holes and travel directions. Many of the trees, referred to as Indian Marker Trees, have been identified across the United States and Texas is host to several famed ones. There is even an historic tree society in Dallas that identifies them.

How can you tell if a tree is one of them? For starters, it has to be really old, as the Native American culture have been gone for over a century from the state. Secondly, it has to stretch sideways for a surprising distance. Lastly, the roots can’t be exposed, as this indicates the tree was possibly damaged by a flood or a storm. Clint Sayers sent me these images of this potential Indian Marker Tree from his ranch in Burnet County. It is certainly a fascinating specimen. While I can not state clearly whether this is or not an Indian Marker Tree, I thank Mr. Sayers for his interest and efforts in helping preserve the unique story of the people who were here first.

Clint Oak Indian Marker Tree, Burnet County

Possible Indian Marker Tree, Burnet County

Clint Oak Indian Marker Tree, Burnet County
Possible Indian Marker Tree, Burnet County

Clint Oak Indian Marker Tree, Burnet County

Possible Indian Marker Tree, Burnet County