Top Vintage Cameras According to GB Mag

Top Vintage Cameras According to GB Mag

In the age of amazing camera phones and instant pictures, there’s still a place for vintage cameras. Here are five selected by GB Mag that combine brilliant design, beautiful lenses and durability. Most importantly, they inspire us to capture our world in images. Enjoy!

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Rolleiflex 3.5
“The medium format Twin Lens Reflex camera (TLR) was built in the 1950’s. It uses two lenses, one at the top to focus, and a taking lens at the bottom. Used extensively by press photographers in the 1950’s, the Rolleiflex 3.5F is famed for its excellent German construction and exquisite image quality. The 3.5F is one of the last cameras to be made by Rolleiflex and features, arguably, the best lens they made for this system.”
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Olympus Trip 35
“The small format 35mm Viewfinder is the perfect introduction to classic film photography. The camera was designed to place excellent optics into the hands of the average consumer and was simple to operate with its zone focusing and automatic exposure. Originally marketed by the famous London-based photographer David Bailey, the Trip 35 was extremely popular throughout its production run. Hunt through charity shops and these little gems can be found for as little as £5 in good working order but can deliver beautiful results.”

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Leica M
Prices start at around £1000 with a lens
“The small format 35mm Rangefinder is the reason the 35mm film format was adopted for stills photography. The M system was introduced in the mid-1950s with the aim to package the best possible optical quality in the smallest possible package. Widely used by photographers of the famous Magnum photo agency, these German-built cameras still exist today in a digital form. In photographic circles, the word Leica is synonymous with the finest build quality and top optical capability and go up from there. The most expensive camera ever sold was a 1923 0-Series Leica which fetched $2,790,000 at auction.”
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Nikon F
Approximately £200-400 depending on age, condition or variation
“A genuine classic, the small format 35mm Single Lens Reflex (SLR) was introduced at the start of the 1960s and became the camera that defined Nikon’s future. Favoured by journalists for its compact size, simplicity and reliability, the camera helped document much of the 1960s and 1970s from the Vietnam War to the Apollo missions.”
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Hasselblad 500 c/m
Approximately £600-800 depending on age, condition or variation
“Production started in the late 1950’s by the Swedish firm Hasselblad for this medium format Single Lens Reflex (SLR), and the system was still being made until very recently. Focusing through the ‘waist level finder’, the benefit of using an SLR’s taking lens is that what you see is what you get. The camera, and its derivatives, remain the staple of any fashion shoot to this day and it is famed for reliable build quality and stunning optics.”